Imperative Languages

Imperative Languages

Imperative programming is a programming paradigm that uses statements that change a program's state. In much the same way that the imperative mood in natural languages expresses commands, an imperative program consists of commands for the computer to perform. Imperative programming focuses on describing how a program operates.The term is often used in contrast to declarative programming, which focuses on what the program should accomplish without specifying how the program should achieve the result.

Procedural Language

A procedural language is a computer programming language that follows, in order, a set of commands. Examples of computer procedural languages are BASIC, C, FORTRAN, Java, and Pascal. Procedural languages are some of the common types of programming languages used by script and software programmers. They make use of functions, conditional statements, and variables to create programs that allow a computer to calculate and display a desired output. Using a procedural language to create a program can be accomplished by using a programming editor or IDE, like Adobe Dreamweaver, Eclipse, or Microsoft Visual Studio. These editors help users develop programming code using one or more procedural languages, test the code, and fix bugs in the code.

Object Oriented Language

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a programming paradigm based on the concept of "objects", which can contain data and code: data in the form of fields (often known as attributes or properties), and code, in the form of procedures (often known as methods). A feature of objects is that an object's own procedures can access and often modify the data fields of itself (objects have a notion of "this" or "self"). In OOP, computer programs are designed by making them out of objects that interact with one another. OOP languages are diverse, but the most popular ones are class-based, meaning that objects are instances of classes, which also determine their types. Many of the most widely used programming languages (such as C++, Java, Python, etc.) are multi-paradigm and they support object-oriented programming to a greater or lesser degree, typically in combination with imperative, procedural programming. Significant object-oriented languages include Java, C++, C#, Python, R, PHP, Visual Basic.NET, JavaScript, Ruby, Perl, Object Pascal, Objective-C, Dart, Swift, Scala, Kotlin, Common Lisp, MATLAB, and Smalltalk.

Parallel Processing Language

Parallel computing is a type of computation in which many calculations or the execution of processes are carried out simultaneously.Large problems can often be divided into smaller ones, which can then be solved at the same time. There are several different forms of parallel computing: bit-level, instruction-level, data, and task parallelism. Parallelism has long been employed in high-performance computing, but has gained broader interest due to the physical constraints preventing frequency scaling.As power consumption (and consequently heat generation) by computers has become a concern in recent years,parallel computing has become the dominant paradigm in computer architecture, mainly in the form of multi-core processors.